Tuesday 141028

Workout
BSquat
5RM
-5% of the 5RM for 5
-10% of the 5RM for 5

MetCon
10 minute test

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds

3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds

2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds

1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)

The Cold Logic of Drunk People

At a bar in France, researchers made people answer questions about philosophy. The more intoxicated the subject, the more utilitarian he or she was likely to be.

Laboratory assistants have to do all sorts of terrible, embarrassing things, but surely this is among the silliest: Enter a bar in Grenoble, France. Identify people who look moderately drunk. Walk up to them, tap them on the shoulder, and say something along the lines of, “Uh, hey, this is awkward, but, would you be interested in answering some questions about philosophy?”

Such was the fate of some poor, unnamed graduate student who did “most of the recruitment” for a recent study about the relationship between alcohol consumption and ethical decision-making. In two separate experiments, researchers presented bar-goers with a questionnaire about philosophy and their state of mind; a total of 102 men and women took part. (“One participant was excluded from the study because he did not follow the instructions properly,” the researchers note—a remarkably low number, considering that all their subjects were drunk.) After the participants filled out the survey, they took a Blood Alcohol Content test so that researchers could measure how intoxicated they were.

The researchers asked participants to give their opinion on two of philosophers’ favorite quandaries: the so-called trolley problem and its cousin, the footbridge problem. In the first, people must choose whether they would flip a switch to divert a runaway trolley, killing one person but sparing five others; the second asks about pushing someone off a bridge for the same purpose. “A drawing accompanied the text of each vignette in order to facilitate understanding of the story,” perhaps in case the subjects were too drunk to read.

“The idea was to look more at the more moral and ethical implications of how alcohol might affect decision-making,” said Aaron Duke, one of the researchers.* His team found a correlation between each subject’s level of intoxication and his or her willingness to flip the switch or push the person—the drunker the subject, the more willing he or she was to kill one hypothetical person for the sake of the hypothetical many. This choice follows the logic of utilitarianism: More good is done by saving five people than harm is done by killing one.

This “really undermines the notion that utilitarian preferences are merely the result of more deliberation,” said Duke, who also co-authored a paper on the study, charmingly titled, “The drunk utilitarian: Blood alcohol concentration predicts utilitarian responses in moral dilemmas.”

There’s a fabulous irony in the idea that drunk people are emotionally steeled rationalists who are willing to do whatever it takes to save lives. But Duke and his research partner, Laurent Bègue, aren’t necessarily arguing that drunk people are ace philosophers and logicians; it’s more that their findings challenge common assumptions about how people make decisions.

“There’s this argument that utilitarian ethics are correct; they’re associated with people who are less emotional. Our finding was that this may not necessarily be the case,” Duke said.

One explanation he offered is that drunk people might be less sensitive to what happens to the guy who’s on the wrong side of the hypothetical tracks or bridge—”it seems like a reasonable explanation that the effects of alcohol would decrease emotional sensitivity toward someone else’s pain.” In general, he said, the study reinforces the complexity of figuring out why people make the choices they do. “Ethical decision-making is influenced by things like substances—it shifts the ethical frame by which we view the world.”

Duke also recognized that the implications of the study are limited, especially because the sample size is so small. Plus, the questions themselves have flaws.

“To be honest, with the trolley problem in general, there is going to be a range of seriousness with which people view it, because it’s kind of a ridiculous premise,” said Duke. “I don’t know that inebriated people would take it any less seriously. But alcohol can make it almost more simplistic—they may be less likely to question some of the assumptions upon which the task is based.”

In other words, drunk people are more willing to “just go with it” when a random graduate student asks them to participate in a thought experiment about killing people. Utilitarian or no, the inebriated may be the philosophy researcher’s dream.

Thursday 131121

Workout

10 minute test

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds

3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds

2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds

1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)

Compare to: Monday 130603  or Thursday 120322

AFTER

Dead Lift
use 90% of your 1 RM + 10 lbs complete:
65% x5
75% x5
85% x5
75% x5
65% x5+

From The Wall Street Journal

Americans Are Living Longer, but Not Necessarily Healthier, Study Shows

Years of Living With Disabilities Increase, Partly Because of Age

By

RON WINSLOW

July 10, 2013 5:34 p.m. ET

Americans are living longer than they did two decades ago, a new study shows, but they are losing ground in key measures of health status to counterparts in other developed nations around the globe.

Americans are living longer than they did two decades ago, a new study shows, but they are losing ground in key measures of health status to counterparts in other developed nations around the globe. Ron Winslow has a look at the study on Lunch Break. Photo: AP.

The findings, from the first major analysis of the health status of the U.S. population in more than 15 years, show progress in reducing death rates, adjusted for age, across a variety of diseases. But death rates from illnesses associated with obesity, such as diabetes and kidney disease, as well as neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, are on the rise.

In addition, years of living with chronic disability, an indicator of quality of life, increased for the average American over the past 20 years, partly reflecting the aging of the population.

Measuring the Health of Americans

See how life expectancy and obesity vary for men and women by state.

Plus, explore an interactive map on health trends at the county level from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

“Individuals in the United States are living longer, but not necessarily in good health,” said the researchers, led by Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, Seattle.

The study was published online Wednesday by JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Murray is also Read more Thursday 131121

Monday 130603

Workout

10 minute test

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds

3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds

2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds

1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)

Compare to: Tuesday 121016

AFTER

Rack Jerk – Heavy Single

Is It Better to Walk or Run?

From The New York Times

By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
Getty Images

Walking and running are the most popular physical activities for American adults. But whether one is preferable to the other in terms of improving health has long been debated. Now a variety of new studies that pitted running directly against walking are providing some answers. Their conclusion? It depends almost completely on what you are hoping to accomplish.

If, for instance, you are looking to control your weight — and shallowly or not, I am — running wins, going away. In a study published last month in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, and unambiguously titled “Greater Weight Loss From Running than Walking,” researchers combed survey data from 15,237 walkers and 32,215 runners enrolled in the National Runners and Walkers Health Study — a large survey being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif.

Participants were asked about their weight, waist circumference, diets and typical weekly walking or running mileage both when they joined the study, and then again up to six years later.

The runners almost uniformly were thinner than the walkers when each joined the study. And they stayed that way throughout. Over the years, the runners maintained their body mass and waistlines far better than the walkers.

The difference was particularly notable among participants over 55. Runners in this age group were not running a lot and Read more Monday 130603

Tuesday 121016

Workout

10 minute test

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds
3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds
2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds
1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)

AFTER

Rack Jerk – Heavy Single

Interesting read from The Hill

Retired military chiefs: Obesity levels mean US is ‘too fat to fight’

By Elise Viebeck – 09/25/12 04:13 PM ET
Spiking rates of childhood obesity are a threat to national security and demand government intervention, according to retired military leaders.

In a report entitled “Still Too Fat to Fight” that was released Tuesday, the advocacy group “Mission: Readiness” described obesity as an epidemic that poses a direct challenge to military effectiveness.

The group called on Congress to continue supporting stricter nutrition standards for school lunches — the kind that have become controversial among small-government conservatives.

“As retired admirals and generals, we know that America is not powerless in the face of this insidious epidemic,” Mission wrote. “Getting the junk food out of our schools is the obvious next step in our efforts to address the childhood obesity crisis.”

In one sense, the report states, obesity means the military has a smaller pool of eligible members because 1 in 4 Americans is too overweight to join.

Combined with other disqualifying factors — including criminal backgrounds and poor education — excess weight means that an estimated 75 percent of young adults could not serve in the military even if they desired to, according to the report.

But obesity poses what may be an even greater challenge Read more Tuesday 121016

Thursday 120802

Chris Ann and Charlie did this yesterday…

Workout

For those that are in the CF Games Open, looks like you are doing a BRUTAL version of “Fran”

A few CF Affilaiates have began “max effort testing” 3-4 time a year.  There are alot of “test” out there, but the one lited below seems to be hard and fair for all.

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds
3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds
2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds
1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)

Compare

Thursday 120322

Workout

For those that are in the CF Games Open, looks like you are doing a BRUTAL version of “Fran”

A few CF Affilaiates have began “max effort testing” 3-4 time a year.  There are alot of “test” out there, but the one lited below seems to be hard and fair for all. 

4-Minutes of Rowing (for calories)
Rest 60 seconds
3-Minutes of Kettlebell Swings
(Men: Adv=24 kg, Int=16 kg; Women: Adv=16 kg, Int=12 kg)
Rest 60 seconds
2-Minutes of Back Squat
(Men: Adv=Bodyweight, Int=3/4 BW; Women: Adv=3/4 BW, Int=1/2 BW)
Rest 60 seconds
1-Minute of Shoulder to Overhead (Push Press/Jerk)
(Men: Adv=95 lbs, Int=75 lbs; Women: Adv=65 lbs, Int=55 lbs)