Friday 120413

Happy Friday the 13th!
Workout
Run 1 Mile
rest 3:00
Run 3/4 of a Mile
rest 2:00
Run 1/2 Mile
Rest 1:00
Run 400m

25-Bsquats using the same weight used for your 100 BSquats.

Here’s an interesting Friday read from Slate…enjoy

The Crisis in American Walking

How we got off the pedestrian path.

By |Posted Tuesday, April 10, 2012, at 6:28 AM ET

A few years ago, at a highway safety conference in Savannah, Ga., I drifted into a conference room where a sign told me a “Pedestrian Safety” panel was being held.

The speaker was Michael Ronkin, a French-born, Swiss-raised, Oregon-based transportation planner whose firm, as his website notes, “specializes in creating walkable and bikeable streets.” Ronkin began with a simple observation that has stayed with me since. Taking stock of the event—one of the few focused on walking, which gets scant attention at traffic safety conferences—he wondered about that inescapable word: pedestrian. If we were to find ourselves out hiking on a forest trail and spied someone approaching at a distance, he wanted to know, would we think to ourselves, “Here comes a pedestrian”?

Of course we wouldn’t. That approaching figure would simply be a person. Pedestrian is a word born from opposition to other modes of travel; the Latin pedester, on foot, gained currency by its semantic tension with equester, on horse. But there is an implied—indeed, synonymous—pejorative. This dates from Ancient Greece. As the Oxford English Dictionary notes, the Greek πεζός meant “prosaic, plain, commonplace, uninspired (sometimes contrasted with the winged flight of Pegasus).” Or, in the Latin, pedester could refer to foot soldiers (e.g, peons), “rather than cavalry.”

In other words, not to be on a horse, flying or otherwise, was to be utterly unremarkable and mundane. To this day, Ronkin was intimating, the word pedestrian bears not only that slightly alien whiff, but the scars of condescension. This became clear as we walked later that evening through the historic center of Savannah. As we moved through the squares, our rambling trajectory matched by our expansive conversation, we were simply people doing that most human of things, walking. But every once in a while, we would encounter a busy thoroughfare, and we became pedestrians. We lurked under ridiculously large retroreflective signs, built not at our scale, but to be seen by those moving at a distance and at speed. Other signs reinforced the message, starkly announcing: “Stop for Pedestrians.” I thought, “Wait, who’s a pedestrian? Is that me?”

Walking

Pedestrian in Nashville, Tenn. in 2010Photograph by Peter van Agtmael/Magnum Photos.

Simply by going out for a walk, I had become a strange being, studied by engineers, inhabiting environments whose physical features are determined Read more Friday 120413

Thursday 101223

Workout

Tabata “Bottom to Bottom” Squat
Run 1 mile or Row 2k

What the length of your index finger says about you

By Michael Hanlon
Last updated at 8:48 AM on 3rd December 2010

The idea that the shape of your hands indicates something profound about your sexual proclivities, the films you like, your athletic ability and your prowess on the stock market seems bizarre.

And yet for many decades now, scientists have noticed an extraordinary link between the ratio of two digits on the hand — the ring and index fingers, known in scientists’ jargon as 2D and 4D — and a whole host of seemingly unrelated traits.

Evidence is growing that this ‘digit ratio’, especially when applied to the right hand, is a fundamental indicator of sexuality, aggression and ­diseases suffered by men.

 Pointing the finger: Scientists have noticed a relationship between finger measurements and a host of unrelated traits

Pointing the finger: Scientists have noticed a relationship between finger measurements and a host of unrelated traits

This week, for example, Read more Thursday 101223

Tuesday 100807

Workout:
“Murph”

In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005.

For time:
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run

Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it. For those that are new to CrossFit, scale the workout (e.g. run 800M and or 25% – 50% or the required reps).

Thursday 091126

Happy Thanksgiving!

Let’s make this a quick one and then get your feed bag on!

Have one of your in-laws join in on the fun!
1M Run
5 rounds of “Cindy”
1M Run

Post time and what you are thankful for to comments…

Monday 090525

Happy Birthday Kelin!

Workout:
“Murph”

In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005.

For time:
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run

Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it. For those that are new to CrossFit, scale the workout (e.g. run 800M and or 25% – 50% or the required reps).

Compare to:
TITANFIT: Friday 080502