Saturday 140524

Workout

“Murph”

Compare to:  Tuesday 100807 or Saturday 130601 or Saturday 120526

From Breaking Muscle 

Powerlifting Versus Olympic Squats: Which Is Better?

 Contributor – Strength and Conditioning, Injury Prevention and Rehab

Generally speaking there are two ways to squat: powerlifting or Olympic style. Even though they are both a squat and legitimate techniques in their own right, there is a bit of a difference when considering the utility and risks of each method.

Both squat styles involve tossing some weight on a barbell, placing it on top of your shoulders, and then dropping your butt down. But within that, there are some significant biomechanical differences between the two. These differences are mostly related to two factors: bar and foot position. Olympic squats are typically performed high bar with a narrow stance, while powerlifting are done low bar with a wide stance. Let’s take a look at some examples.

The Olympic Squat

The bar should rest on the athlete’s upper traps and the heels are below the shoulders or slightly closer. The knees should be pushed outside of the heel on the way down. The result of all of these things is that the Olympic squat tends to emphasize your quads and trunk stabilizers, while still using a fair bit of gluteal recruitment.

I’m sure you’ve heard “in a squat your knees shouldn’t pass your toes.” In a general sense, this cue is meant to prevent athletes and patients from putting a significant shearing force on their patellar tendon. But check out the bottom position of this squat (pictured above). My knees are right at my toes if not a bit past them.

As far as an Olympic squat is concerned, the cue about not letting your knee track forward is garbage. A taller or more mobile athlete may exhibit a squat where the knees pass the toes, but as long as form is otherwise in check and the heels maintain contact with the floor, proper gluteal recruitment in this position should prevent any significant shear to the tendon. But remember, kids, this is not a blank check to start throwing your knees forward on your squatsProper form is still paramount.

The Powerlifting Squat

The bar is below your upper Read more Saturday 140524

Saturday 130601

Workout

“Murph”!

Compare to: Saturday 120526

Post WOD

Typical TitanFit Fun!

Children of long-lived parents less likely to get cancer

The offspring of parents who live to a ripe old age are more likely to live longer themselves, and less prone to cancer and other common diseases associated with ageing, a study has revealed. Experts at the University of Exeter Medical School, supported by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care in the South West Peninsula (NIHR PenCLAHRC), led an international collaboration which discovered that people who had a long-lived mother or father were 24% less likely to get cancer. The scientists compared the children of long-lived parents to children whose parents survived to average ages for their generation.

The scientists classified long-lived mothers as those who survived past 91 years old, and compared them to those who reached average age spans of 77 to 91. Long-lived fathers lived past 87 years old, compared with the average of 65 to 87 years. The scientists studied 938 new cases of cancer that developed during the 18 year follow-up period.

The team also involved experts from the National Institute for Health and Medical Research in France (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale), the University of Michigan and the University of Iowa. They found that overall mortality rates dropped by up to 19 per cent for each decade that at least one of the parents lived past the age of 65. For those whose mothers lived beyond 85, mortality rates were 40 per cent lower. The figure was a little lower (14 per cent) for fathers, possibly because of adverse lifestyle factors such as smoking, which may have been more common in the fathers.

In the study, published TBC in the The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, the scientists analysed data from Read more Saturday 130601

Tuesday 100807

Workout:
“Murph”

In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005.

For time:
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run

Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it. For those that are new to CrossFit, scale the workout (e.g. run 800M and or 25% – 50% or the required reps).

Monday 090525

Happy Birthday Kelin!

Workout:
“Murph”

In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005.

For time:
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run

Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it. For those that are new to CrossFit, scale the workout (e.g. run 800M and or 25% – 50% or the required reps).

Compare to:
TITANFIT: Friday 080502

Friday 080502

Workout:
“Murph” In memory of Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, 29, of Patchogue, N.Y., who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005.
For time:
1 mile Run
100 Pull-ups
200 Push-ups
300 Squats
1 mile Run

Partition the pull-ups, push-ups, and squats as needed. Start and finish with a mile run. If you’ve got a twenty pound vest or body armor, wear it. For those that are new to CrossFit, scale the workout (e.g. run 800M and or 25% – 50% or the required reps).

Compare to:
TITANFIT: Monday 080324