Wednesday 140827

Warm-up

Snatch Balance.  Work up to 50% of your Snatch 1RM

Workout

Yep…it that time.  Time to pull the sled

I remember a MTV add with Denis Leary saying this day was coming.  From The Atlantic

This Fall, Minorities Will Outnumber White Students in U.S. Schools

A new study shows the changing demographics in American education.

While 62 percent of the total U.S. population was classified as non-Hispanic white in 2013, when public schools start this fall their racial landscape will reflect a different America.

According to a new report by the National Center for Education (NCES), minorities—Hispanics, Asians, African American, Native Americans, and multiracial individuals—will account for 50.3 percent of public school students. To break this down by grade levels, minorities will make up 51 percent of pre-kindergarteners to 8th graders and 48 percent of 9th to 12th graders.

Public Schools in the United States Projected to Be Majority Minority in 2014

Note: Whites, blacks, Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native include only non-Hispanics. Hispanics are of any race. Prior to 2008, “two or more races” was not an available category. (Pew Research Center)

This change in enrollment comes amidst a growth in the percentage of U.S.-born Hispanics and Asians in the overall population. Between 2012 and 2013, the Hispanic population grew by 2.1 percent and the Asian population grew by 2.9 percent. And reflecting these numbers, public schools will see big hikes in Asian and Hispanic students between 2011 and 2022. Hispanic students will rise by 33 percent, Asian/Pacific Islanders by 20 percent, multiracial students by 44 percent, and African-Americans by 2 percent between 2011 and 2022. Meanwhile the percentage of Caucasians is projected to decrease by 6 percent and of American Indian/Alaska Natives to decrease by 5 percent.

Enrollment in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools by Race and Ethnicity

National Center for Education

Hispanics and Asians are also forecast to produce the biggest increase in high school graduates: Between 2009-10 and 2022-23, there will be an increase of 64 percent in Hispanic graduates and 23 percent in Asian/Pacific Islanders.

However, this demographic change raises some concerns. Hispanic, black, and Native American students tend to academically fall behind their white and Asian counterparts. And Hispanic and black students tend to live and attend schools in areas of greater poverty than whites. Leaders in education need to tackle some key issues regarding academic and economic disparities between minorities and whites, not to mention racial division and resource availability.

Wednesday 140716

Workout
2x
400m Sled Drag (M 90/ F 60)
20-Bsquats @ 50% of 1RM

From The LA Times

Obesity: We’re not overeating, we’re under-exercising, study suggests

Exercise

Medical Research Obesity Research Stanford University

What’s behind the rise in obesity? Researchers say it may be too little exercise, not too much food

In 2010, 52% of women said they do no exercise outside of work

A new study suggests that under-exercising, rather than overeating, may be at the heart of America’s obesity epidemic.

Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine report a strong correlation between the rise in obesity and a striking drop in the amount of time Americans spend exercising when not at work over the last 22 years.

Their analysis uncovered no evidence that American’s have increased their daily calorie count in the same time period.

“We wouldn’t say that calories don’t count, but the main takeaway is that we have to look very carefully at physical activity. The problem is not all in the intake of calories,” said Dr. Uri Ladabaum, a professor of gastroenterology at Stanford Medical School. Ladabaum is also the lead author of the study that will be published in the August issue of the American Journal of Medicine.

The study relies on data collected by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1988 to 2010, which Ladabaum and his team used to look for trends in obesity, abdominal obesity, physical activity and caloric intake in the last two decades.

The most startling finding in the study is the drop in the amount of exercise Americans do in our free time. The researchers found that from 1988 to 2010, the percentage of adults who reported doing no exercise in their free time grew dramatically from 19% to 52% in women, and from 11% to 43% in men.

“We suspected there was a trend in that direction, but not that magnitude,” said Ladabaum. “People can get exercise in other ways, but most people don’t walk or bike to work, and most people are not in jobs that require physical activity.”

At the same time, the researchers found that the prevalence of obesity increased from 25% to 35% in women, and from 20% to 35% in men. In that time period the proportion of normal weight men and women dropped, while the proportion of overweight men and women remained the same.

But here comes the surprising part: The researchers did not find any evidence that people were ingesting more calories on a daily basis in 2010 than they were in 1988.

“The one caveat here is that the amount of calorie intake was based on self report, so it is possible people were not recalling correctly what they ate, or not reporting correctly,” said Ladabaum.

Ladabaum notes that the study can tell us only that a major drop in time spent exercising occurred at the same time as a rise in obesity, not that one caused the other.

“The study looks at trends and certain associations, but does not prove any cause and effect between these,” he said.

He also wants to make clear that the fact that the average caloric intake did not change substantially does not mean that caloric intake has been optimal at the population level or at the level of individuals.

“We simply did not detect a substantial increase over time,” he said.

Even with all those caveats, however, this study could still be used to inform policy on managing America’s obesity epidemic.

“Even though it is very difficult to prove directly that public health interventions promoting physical activity will make a difference, I think they will,” he said. “This study should serve as a reinforcement of the message that we need to think of a multi-component solution where diet is a big part of it, and physical activity is a big part as well.”

However, there is a big difference between telling people that they should be exercising and actually getting them to do it.

“The finger wagging Puritan in me wants sedentary folks to get off the couch and exercise, but my public health background cautions me to go beyond the data tables and look at the lives of Americans today,” writes Pamela Powers Hannely, managing editor of the American Journal of Medicine in an editorial.

She notes that single mothers in particular, may have difficulty figuring out how to work exercise into their already hectic lives. She also wonders if this may explain why the rise in obesity has been most prevalent in women between the ages of 18 to 39.

Thursday 140626

Workout
4x
200m Sled Pull + 200m Farmer’s Carry

Those crazy Brits…

From The Huffington Post

#FreeTheNipple: This Bikini Top Sticks Two Fingers Up To Censorship

The Huffington Post UK  |  By  Posted: 24/06/2014 18:22 BST  |  Updated: 25/06/2014 09:59 BST

Head to a beach this summer and you might see a bunch of women walking around with their nipples on show. But, before you drop your ice-cream cone on the floor and gawk, know that all may not be as it first seems.

The women may very well be sporting the new TaTa Top – a bikini top with two pink nipples emblazoned onto the cups.

At first glance the top may seem like some hilarious prank, but dig slightly below the surface and its creators have a distinctly more feminist agenda.

tata top 1

While men are free to walk shirtless as they please, being topless if you’re a woman is illegal in some American states.

With that in mind the bizarrely realistic garment has been created in order to tackle the lack of gender equality when it comes to bearing all.

On their website the makers of the bikini, Robyn Graves and Michelle Lytle, write: “Why can’t girls be topless? If you really think about it, what’s the difference between a man’s nipples and a woman’s? Is it really just the extra breast tissue? Is it the fact that women’s nipples are paired with a vagina?

“Is it the presence of a real and true female nipple bare to the world that is so offensive, that is so horrid that it must be kept covered?

“Who is this law protecting and what are they protecting them from? What message does it send to young women about their bodies? That they should be ashamed and keep them covered?”

Although not directly associated, the bikini hits (online) shelves in the wake of the#FreeTheNipple movement.

The campaign – originally started by filmmaker Lina Esco – has seen hundreds of women parade topless around New York to end gender-specific double standards.

The TaTa Top will allow women to support the campaign in a way that’s completely legal (and brilliantly sneaky).

tata top 2

“You look topless…but you aren’t, and therefore, are not breaking any laws,” the website reiterates.

“If the sight of uncovered nipples makes you shudder in fear or pop off in anger, then game on and may the breast girl win.”

Happy customers have already been wearing the top with pride and posting some utterly fabulous snaps on Instagram… Read more Thursday 140626