Tuesday 160510

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between
Box Jumps
Pull-Ups
Burpees
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Wall Ball Shots
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Assault Bike

From Evidence in Motion

The Power of Images

Resolution of Herniation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I speak frequently about the continued overutilization of diagnostic imaging in the management of musculoskeletal disorders.  As humans we are use to looking at wrinkles on the outside.  Some of us may choose to inject the wrinkes with a poison to paralyze the surrounding musculature in order to “flatten” them.  However, most agree that in and off themselves these wrinkles on the outside are pain free and a normal part of this wonderful journey we call life.  As humans we are not nearly as comfortable peering inside the body and seeing wrinkles on the inside.  This is not at all surprising as MRIs are a very recent invention (like while I was in high school and I am not that old). The vast majority of us have never even peered inside of our body except occasionally within our mouth and perhaps our nose (PS this trimmer has a light).   Those of us without visual deficits are used to seeing our reflection in a mirror and are not startled into making poor choices.  However, we need to look no further than wild animals (see here) who react strongly in various ways when confronted with this foreign image of self which is often scary.

At Manipalooza this past weekend in Denver I was surrounded by passionate PTs who are making a difference.  However, I continue to hear far too many stories about patients who are increasingly younger with musculoskeletal pain being “scared” into a surgery by showing a foreign image (i.e. an MRI of their body) and told that bad things will happen if they don’t act quickly with a surgical intervention.  It is not surprising that patients are scared sick.   Hopefully the recent image shown above in this short article from the New England Journal of Medicine will have an impact.  The article described a 29-year-old woman with new-onset right leg pain and paresthesia. There were no bowel or bladder symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a lumbar disk herniation resulting in substantial spinal stenosis and nerve-root compression. She elected conservative treatment with physical therapy and an epidural injection of glucocorticoids. A second MRI at 5 months showed resolution of the herniation.  Please share this example liberally, make posters on your wall, and send it to family members. Images are more powerful than words.   All surgery is not bad, however it should be a rare event when it comes to low back pain.

Wednesday 151111

Workout

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between

Box Jumps (24/20)
Pull-Ups
Burpees
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Wall Ball
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

Compare to: Thursday 140619

Saturday 141206

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between

Box Jumps (24/20)
Pull-Ups
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Burpees
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

Compare to: Thursday 140619

Thursday 140619

Workout

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between

Box Jumps (24/20)
Pull-Ups
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Burpees
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

From The Daily Hit

Fix these Push-Up Mistakes

Women Push Ups

I just found out I’m doing push-ups wrong! My world is shattered, but thankfully I’ve fixed my mistakes.

If you’re anything like me, it’s time to adjust your push-up form so that you’re doing them right. Here are a few mistakes you may need to fix:

Twisted Wrists

If your wrists are turned inwards, it makes it easier for your chest but harder on your elbows and wrists. Instead, make sure your hands are pointed straight ahead, and grip the floor with your forearm for better posture.

Dropped Head

Touching your nose to the floor doesn’t make the actual push-up any easier, it just means you have bad form. Avoid that stress on your neck by keeping your head in line with your spine, and DON’T MOVE IT!

Flared Elbows

Flaring out your elbows makes it easier to push back up, particularly if your chest muscles are weak or tired. Unfortunately, that detracts from the workout for your triceps, so keep your elbows close to your body to isolate those bingo wings.

Raised Butt

If you can’t keep your core tight, you won’t get the proper intensity for that exercise–both for your upper body and core. Keep that butt in line with your back and legs, and squeeze your glutes and abs to keep your form tight.

Push-Ups on Knees

Just because it’s easier, that doesn’t make it better. If you can’t finish the set on your hands, turn to an incline push-up rather than kneeling pushups. Incline push-ups take the weight off your hands, but still force you to keep the right form.

Monday 131125

Workout

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between

Box Jumps (24/20)
Pull-Ups
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Burpees
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

We took out the sit-ups as TTBs enough.  Now there are 9 exercises vs. the original 10.  As such, you will likely have fewer reps than your previous attempt.  Compare to: Friday 130215

From Business Insider

4 Terrible Pieces Of Career Advice You Should Ignore

Giving advice

I coach, teach, and mentor about work, jobs, and careers for a living. And I’m big on taking risks, making mistakes, living and learning, pushing boundaries. You may overhear me say things like “if something is worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” I was never one for moderation, and still struggle to stay within the designated zone. So, when someone like me advises caution, it means something.

My interest in other peoples’ wellbeing and success is deep and genuine. What follows is from the heart, even if it sounds harsh. Someone’s got to be the bad cop and call it like it is. I worry that good, well-meaning folks, and especially our youth, are being told things that are simply untrue and don’t stand up to any objective scrutiny—things that create impossible expectations, are incredibly misleading, and essentially lead people down the garden path full of unicorns and rainbows.

Of course we want to inspire our clients, our students, and our mentees to pursue their dreams. Our garden and our path must have the occasional unicorn and rainbow to make us believe in beautiful things. But our path must also be true, real, and stable. To that end, there are a few things we need to stop saying. Here are four of them:

1. You can be anyone you want to be.

This belongs right up there with “you can have it all.” You can’t be anyone you want to be, nor can you have it all. The universe is specifically designed to prevent this.

Those who say this — especially to women — typically have an unusually fortuitous career and life story to tell, and it’s from this perch that they preach to the more earth-bound.

Here’s what we really should be saying: You can’t be anyone you want to be, but you can be more of who you already are. All of us are born with specific talents and gifts. We have certain natural inclinations and capacities. Over time, we add to these with learned skills and experiences. The sum total of this package is what makes you unique and what will allow you to make unique contributions to this world. This is what you have going for you—not being anyone you want to be, but developing who you already are.

Your best bet is to identify and develop this set of innate talents and strengths. If you’re unsure, take some tests, such as Myers-Briggs and Strengths Finder. They will identify a list of careers where you would most likely succeed based on your strengths.

There is great joy in embracing and being as much of who you are as possible. In fact, if you shirk away from this, the world loses out on you.

2. You can do anything you want. All it takes is hard work and determination.

This statement is thrown around usually after a one-in-a-million example: Albert Einstein didn’t speak until he was four and didn’t read until seven, but turned out to win a Nobel prize; Oprah Winfrey was fired from her television-reporting job and told she wasn’t fit to be on screen, but today she is the billionaire queen of television talk shows; Michael Jordan was actually cut from his high school basketball team before going on to become possibly the best basketball player of all time.

These people did amazing things, no doubt. But the reason these stories are so inspirational is because they are few and far between. We’re being disingenuous if we attribute it all to hard work, since an incredible amount of natural talent played a part, but luck especially had huge influence. Scientists who study the huge acclaim of hits like “Harry Potter” or how certain people become overnight successes share that the processes involved are highly unpredictable, and don’t necessarily have a bearing on the quality of the product or the effort expended. It’s not that the success isn’t deserved, but that it’s wildly out of proportion with any objective measure of quality.

The truth we don’t want to accept is that hard work is only one part of the equation. There are a lot of hardworking people out there. In fact, there are people working three jobs and making just enough to pay rent. These people work hard, but still fall short of meeting their goals. Why? Well, there are a myriad reasons: a lack of education or training, inevitable circumstances, planned or unexpected constraints, and unforeseen events, such as poor health or a prolonged recession.

Look, we need inspiration to motivate us to keep us going, to give it our best shot. I do one key thing all day, and that is encouraging my clients — especially my graduate student clients — to put forth their very best efforts. But I’m not going to tell the fish who can’t climb trees that maybe they should just work harder at it. You know what that does? It leads to self-doubt and low self-esteem.

3. Follow your passion. The money will follow.

The number of self-help gurus and motivational speakers who say this with a straight face is astounding. Popular career books like to peddle it, too, probably because it’s a lovely idea and one that sells.

“Follow your passion” or “do what you love” may be perfectly valid advice, but when it comes to finding a career you like that is also sustainable, love and passion alone won’t cut it.

There is no quick fix for career happiness. It’s a long road of trying things out, identifying what you’re naturally good at, and being willing to work at a passion through classes and taking on additional responsibilities wherever you can, such as through volunteering or pro bono work.

There may also be underlying factors to your career malaise. You may find that, even in your new passion, things may not hold for long because “everywhere you go, there you are.” If I tell you the number of clients that come to us post burn-out from the “passion carousel,” you’d be surprised.

So, what’s the major disconnection between all this passion and the money that’s not following? Your passion has to sell. No matter how much you love a thing, it’s not a livelihood unless and until you can sell it. What you love must also be what the world needs. It must be something that the market values and will pay for. This is not optional. It’s mandatory.

And since you have to be able to sell your passion, you must be good at your passion. You can’t just love yoga. You have to be talented at some aspect of it — teaching it, writing about it — in order to make a living. I love career coaching, but I won’t survive or thrive unless I’m good at it. Ideally, what you’re good at and what you love will converge over time.

This is why we repeatedly emphasize the following in our workshops and blog posts: instead of focusing on passion, look at what you are naturally good at, what comes to you relatively easily, what energizes you, what others recognize you for, and what you’ve been rewarded and promoted for.

Look at your current job situation: what are the tasks that engage and energize you versus the ones that shut you down? Where do you excel with ease, and where do you struggle? Where can you make a contribution to your team, your organization, or your community? This last one alone can create a sense of purpose and — God forbid — real passion.

4. Dance like nobody is watching.

This is bad advice — period. If you are in public, you should not dance like nobody is watching. People are watching, and most of them have video recorders on their cell phones.

Anyone who wants to hire you, network with you, work with you, or date you will google you. They can easily find what you share on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube. You don’t have to curate content as perfectly as we do for our clients, but, at the very least, make sure that your post, pins, likes, and tweets are fairly innocuous. Would you be comfortable if both your boss and your mom saw it? If the answer is no, then don’t put it on the internet. It’s shocking how many people don’t seem to have a handle on this. The world is small, people — very small. And when you’re looking for work, it’s actually pretty tiny.

Here’s the good news:

Wonderful things are possible in this world. Many people find work they love, can sustain it, and make a decent living out of it, while also contributing to their families, friends, and community. The key is to get to know yourself well, embrace your natural strengths, and slowly but surely move in the direction of matching these to correlated lines of work. The universe has a way of collaborating with what is both possible and inspiring.

Wonderful things are possible in this world.

Monday 130422

Welcome to Indianapolis FDIC 2013!

FDIC

Workout

0600

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between
Pull-Ups
Burpees
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Sit-Ups (touch your toes)
Box Jumps (24/20)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

Compare to: Friday 130215

1100

Texas Squats

1700

TitanFit Test

From The Huffington Post

How To Fix Health Problems With Exercise

Posted: 04/21/2013 10:55 am EDT

Exercise Health Benefits

By Jessica Girdwain

Ever wonder why you feel so great after you break a sweat? Turns out, exercise isn’t just an effective flab-fighter — it’s a remedy for pretty much any troubling health issue you are facing: anxiety, insomnia, back pain — even hot flashes. “When it comes to preventing health problems, exercise is one of the best medicines we have,” says David Katz, M.D., founding director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. But some workouts are better than others for healing what ails you. Try these active solutions.

Anxiety
A proven way to ease anxiety naturally is with a bout of cardio, says Michael Otto, Ph.D., co-author of Exercise for Mood And Anxiety. Getting your heart pumping increases the release of mood-stabilizing neurotransmitters, like serotonin, norepinephrine and GABA, which is why you can feel like you’re sweating off stress during Spinning class. The good vibes continue: A study in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise showed that doing 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (jogging, not sprinting) makes you more resilient against stressors hours later, like preparing for that big meeting with your boss. And over the long term, “people who work out consistently report less overall stress, anxiety and depression,” Otto says.

Your Fitness Rx: Do a quick blast of cardio on the morning of a hectic day, or to unwind at the end of one. If possible, take it outside — numerous studies show that fresh air provides a big mood boost.

Daytime Sleepiness
Instead of leaning on caffeine (which can prevent you from falling asleep later, causing drowsiness again the next day), get moving. Folks who meet the recommended physical activity guidelines of 150 minutes a week are 65 percent less likely to feel tuckered out during the day, a 2011 study found. “Exercisers fall asleep Read more Monday 130422

Friday 130215

Workout

TitanFit Test

2:00 at each exercise 2:00 rest between
Pull-Ups
Burpees
KB Swings (1.5/1)
Push-Ups (games style)
Air Squats (full extension at the top)
Sit-Ups (touch your toes)
Box Jumps (24/20)
Row (Cals)
TTB
Double Unders*

*This portion is 1 minute.  Single unders 4 to 1 to double unders!

From the other side of the “Pond” Mail Online

Forget energy drinks – TOMATO juice could be the key to recovering from a workout

  • Tomatoes provide vital chemicals to help muscles recover after being stretched and strained
  • Juice also helps blood sugar return to normal level
  • Compound called lycopene thought to help the process

By ANNA HODGEKISS

PUBLISHED: 10:38 EST, 12 February 2013 | UPDATED: 10:59 EST, 12 February 2013

Tomato juice could be better than energy drinks at helping the body recover from exercise
Tomato juice could be better than energy drinks at helping the body recover from exercise

Tomato juice could be better than energy drinks at helping the body recover from exercise, new research suggests.

Experts experts say tomatoes provide vital chemicals to help muscles recover and blood levels return to normal after being stretched and strained.

Experts from a number of health institutions in Greece conducted tests on 15 athletes over a period of two months, looking at vital signs before, during and after exercise.

Nine of the athletes drank tomato juice after exercise and six consumed their regular fizzy energy drink.

Those drinking tomato juice had quicker levels of muscle recovery and their glucose levels returned to normal faster after strenuous exercise.

Tomatoes contain a compound called lycopene, which principally give them their deep-red colour.

Anti-oxidants in tomatoes are already known to combat cancer, heart disease and other ailments, which is why some people adopting a Mediterranean diet appear to live longer.

In the latest study, harmful levels of enzymes and proteins which contribute to muscle and brain damage returned to normal quicker in those athletes who drank tomato juice after exercise.

The researchers said tomato juice was so effective that people with higher levels of harmful proteins could benefit in just two months.

Experts say it could provide vital chemicals to help muscles recover and blood levels return to normal after being stretched and strained
Experts say it could provide vital chemicals to help muscles recover and blood levels return to normal after being stretched and strained

The study, led by researchers at the General Chemical State Laboratory of Greece, was published in journal Food and Chemical Toxicology.

The findings back up previous Swedish research which found that tomato juice helped to reduce oxidative damage after exercise.

Researchers in Stockholm asked a group of healthy volunteers to exercise at 80 per cent of their maximum heart rate for 20 minutes.

After the exercise session, they tested their blood for a compound called 8-oxodG, a chemical that’s a marker for oxidative damage.

This occurs as a result of chemical reactions in the body which release harmful oxygen-rich molecules that attack tissue and cause permanent damage – and is implicated as a cause of many illnesses

The researchers found that volunteers who sipped tomato juice after exercise for five weeks did experience so much oxidative damage.